We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Harvard: Why the Crew, and not the Captain, Will Save America / by Jon Jeter

Originally published: Patreon, Augusta, 2022 In the autumn of 2000, I traveled to the southern African nation of Mozambique to write a story about the collapse of the country’s cashew industry. Sixteen years of ruinous  civil war had left Mozambique’s cashew groves in bad shape, and the local processing plants unable to afford the rawContinue reading “We Don’t Need No Stinkin’ Harvard: Why the Crew, and not the Captain, Will Save America / by Jon Jeter”

The legacy of scientific racism / by Prabir Purkayasthaaug

Originally published: LA Progressive on August 10, 2022; produced in partnership by Newsclick and Globetrotter. In July, the world celebrated 200 years since the birth of Gregor Mendel, who is widely accepted as the “father of modern genetics” for his discovery of the laws of inheritance. His experiments with peas, published in 1866 under the title “Experiments in Plant Hybridization,” identifiedContinue reading “The legacy of scientific racism / by Prabir Purkayasthaaug”

“Notes on Exterminism” for the Twenty-First-Century Ecology and Peace Movements / by John Bellamy Foster

Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park | photo credit: nippon.com Originally published in Monthly Review In 1980, the great English historian and Marxist theorist E. P. Thompson, author of The Making of the English Working Class and leader of the European Nuclear Disarmament movement, wrote the pathbreaking essay “Notes on Exterminism, the Last Stage of Civilization.”1 Although the world hasContinue reading ““Notes on Exterminism” for the Twenty-First-Century Ecology and Peace Movements / by John Bellamy Foster”